HEALTH SCIENCE BLOG

12
Dec 2013

Optimizing the Benefits of Garcinia Cambogia

Garcinia cambogia is no stranger to the pages of TotalHealth magazine—it was discussed in 2010 under the title, “Insulin, the Real Cause of Weight Gain.”1 However, few researchers on Garcinia extracts were prepared for the soaring increase in popularity of this item and its active ingredient, (-)-hydroxycitric acid (HCA), sparked by its late 2012 featuring on the Dr. Oz TV Show. The subsequent demand for Garcinia products has been plagued by two major issues.

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05
May 2013

Are Calcium Salts of HCA Worthless?

Problems with bioavailability and a lack of efficacy are surprisingly common with health food supplements and hydroxycitric acid products are not exceptions. Today, the vast preponderance of commercial products being sold as containing or supplying HCA are stabilized using calcium or a mixture of calcium and potassium to yield HCA salts. There are several reasons for creating HCA salts rather than using liquid HCA as either a free acid or an acid/lactone mixture. For one thing, powders typically are easier to store, transport and work with than are liquids. In the case of HCA, other reasons include the fact that the HCA free acid and its lactone exhibit limited bioavailability and limited interaction with the ATP:citrate-lyase enzyme, one of the primary targets of HCA’s actions. On the positive side, HCA calcium and calcium-potassium salts are cheap to make.

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04
Apr 2013

Glycostat® Bitter Melon

Momordica charantia, commonly known as bitter melon or bitter gourd, has a long history of use as a culinary staple and a hypoglycemic agent in Southeast Asia. There is a plethora of botanical varieties recognized by native peoples, who differentiate between those good for eating and those good for medicine.

Animal studies consistently find blood-sugar regulating effects associated with certain varieties of bitter melon, including improvements in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, especially when using freshly juiced or freshly extracted material. Despite significant investigation, the suite of important constituents responsible for the effects of bitter melon is poorly characterized. In fact, it is often found that creating extracts of bitter melon leads to a decrease in native activity.

A critical review of bitter melon research indicates that not only are some varieties preferred to others, but also that preparation methods play a significant role in overall activity and can explain large variations in reported dosing protocols. Neither the charantin nor the bitters components of bitter melon in published work have proven sufficient to explain the various benefits of fresh and freshly extracted bitter melon. Not everything labeled “bitter melon extract” is created equal.

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12
Dec 2012

Weight Loss Basics

Over the years, a great many weight loss products have come and gone. Each new weight loss season, a fresh crop of dragon slayers is announced and by the end of the year, most of these have slipped into well-deserved oblivion. Turnover on this level tends to obscure the fact there are some approaches that work and that the fundamentals of weight control are reasonably well established, even if products are not.

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12
Dec 2012

Insulin, the Real Cause of Weight Gain—Discovering Assam Gelugur

No one doubts that obesity is a problem in the United States. According to figures released by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in January 2010 analyzing the period 2007–2008, the prevalence of obesity was 32.2 percent among adult men and 35.5 percent among adult women. The age-adjusted prevalence of overweight and obesity combined was 68.0 percent overall; 72.3 percent among men, and 64.1 percent among women. That’s right: in 2008 an estimated 68 percent of Americans were overweight or obese! To put this in perspective, from 1960–2 to 2005–6, the prevalence of obesity increased from 13.4 to 35.1 percent in U.S. adults 20 to 74.7 years of age.

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